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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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The microbiology of railway tracks in 3 urban locations

Smith, A.D. and Hughes, R.K. and Wood, B.J.B. (1981) The microbiology of railway tracks in 3 urban locations. Environmental Pollution Series A- Ecological and Biological, 26 (3). pp. 193-201. ISSN 0269-7491

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Abstract

The microbial degradation of oil on railway tracks was studied as part of a preliminary investigation of the possible stimulation of oil biodegradation on track. Railway ballast harbours a diverse population of micro-organisms represented by species of yeast, bacteria and filamentous fungi. Highest numbers of oil-degrading organisms, around 106 g−1 of ballast, were isolated during the wetter winter months. There was some seasonal fluctuation in population composition but Pseudomonas, Rhodotorula and Cladosporium were the dominant genera. The track is arid, prone to great temperature fluctuations and appears to be nitrogen-limited in stations. High levels of iron, silicon, aluminium and tin were found in oil extracted from track. The indigenous population of micro-organisms must be finely adapted for survival in an extremely harsh environment.