Picture child's feet next to pens, pencils and paper

Open Access research that is helping to improve educational outcomes for children

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Education, including those researching educational and social practices in curricular subjects. Research in this area seeks to understand the complex influences that increase curricula capacity and engagement by studying how curriculum practices relate to cultural, intellectual and social practices in and out of schools and nurseries.

Research at the School of Education also spans a number of other areas, including inclusive pedagogy, philosophy of education, health and wellbeing within health-related aspects of education (e.g. physical education and sport pedagogy, autism and technology, counselling education, and pedagogies for mental and emotional health), languages education, and other areas.

Explore Open Access education research. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Environmentally induced short-term variability in the growth rates of larval herring

Gallego, A. and Heath, M.R. and McKenzie, E. and Cargill, L.H. (1996) Environmentally induced short-term variability in the growth rates of larval herring. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 137 (1-3). pp. 11-23. ISSN 0171-8630

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

The growth of herring Clupea harengus larvae within a patch tracked for approximately 20 d in the Orkney-Shetland area (north of Scotland) was investigated using otolith microstructure and, in a supporting role, condition factor analyses. Daily otolith growth responded conservatively to external factors, there being significant autocorrelation within individual otolith increment sequences. Past growth history explained most of the variation of the data. Both otolith microstructure and condition factor analyses yielded consistent results, indicating that short term variations in growth rate were related to environmental factors such as wind-induced turbulence level, and changes in illumination and prey concentration. A dome-shaped effect of wind-generated turbulence on larval growth was detected, which indicated a maximum response at a wind speed of approximately 14.5 m s(-1), a value very close to the speeds predicted by theoretical studies to generate maximum ingestion rates of larval fish.