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Luminescence temperature sensing using poly(vinyl alcohol)-encapsulated ru(bpy)(3)(2+) films

Mills, A. and Tommons, Cheryl and Bailey, R.T. and Tedford, M.Catriona and Crilly, Peter J. (2006) Luminescence temperature sensing using poly(vinyl alcohol)-encapsulated ru(bpy)(3)(2+) films. Analyst, 131 (4). pp. 495-500. ISSN 0003-2654

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Abstract

The ruthenium(II) diimine complexes, such as ruthenium(II) tris(bipyridyl), Ru(bpy)32+, possess highly luminescent excited states that are not only readily quenched by oxygen but also by an increase in temperature. The former effect can be rendered insignificant by encapsulating the complex in an oxygen impermeable polymer, although encapsulation often leads also to a loss of temperature sensitivity. The luminescence properties of Ru(bpy)32+ encapsulated in PVA were studied as a function of oxygen concentration and temperature and found to be independent of the former, but still very sensitive towards the latter. The results were fitted to an established Arrhenius-type equation, based on thermal quenching of the emitting state by a slightly higher (E= 3100 cm-1)3d-d state that deactivates very rapidly (10-13 s)via a non-radiative process.