Picture of rolled up £5 note

Open Access research that shapes economic thinking...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by the Fraser of Allander Institute (FAI), a leading independent economic research unit focused on the Scottish economy and based within the Department of Economics. The FAI focuses on research exploring economics and its role within sustainable growth policy, fiscal analysis, energy and climate change, labour market trends, inclusive growth and wellbeing.

The open content by FAI made available by Strathprints also includes an archive of over 40 years of papers and commentaries published in the Fraser of Allander Economic Commentary, formerly known as the Quarterly Economic Commentary. Founded in 1975, "the Commentary" is the leading publication on the Scottish economy and offers authoritative and independent analysis of the key issues of the day.

Explore Open Access research by FAI or the Department of Economics - or read papers from the Commentary archive [1975-2006] and [2007-2018]. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Isotope values of atmospheric halocarbons and hydrocarbons from Irish urban, rural, and marine locations

Redeker, K. R. and Davis, S. and Kalin, R. M. (2007) Isotope values of atmospheric halocarbons and hydrocarbons from Irish urban, rural, and marine locations. Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres, 112. ISSN 2169-897X

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Stable carbon isotope ratios for 37 hydrocarbon, CFC and halocarbon compounds were determined over the course of 1 year (86 samples) from the urban Belfast environment, Northern Ireland (NI). A smaller number of samples were collected from rural locations at Crossgar and Hillsborough, NI, and one marine location at Mace Head, Republic of Ireland. Source δ13C “signatures” suggest that <C5 alkanes are most likely derived from natural gas and liquid petroleum gas while >C5 alkanes and ≥C4 alkenes are most likely derived from vehicle emissions. C3–C5 hydrocarbons show significant enrichment of δ13C with iso‐alkanes < n‐alkanes < alkenes < alkynes. There is also significant enrichment of δ13C from propane to n‐butane to n‐pentane. There is no significant separation between n‐pentane, n‐hexane, n‐heptane or methyl‐butane, methyl pentane and methyl hexanes. Calculated hydroxyl reaction kinetic isotope effects and subsequent δ13C enrichment are insufficient to explain shifts in isotopic ratio relative to concentration for all compounds as is differences in origin of air mass. Very few compounds show significant diurnal shifts; however, alkanes and ≥C4 alkenes demonstrate consistent enrichment of isotopic ratios when summer samples are compared to winter samples. Benzene is the sole compound measured that appears to become more depleted in δ13C when summer samples are compared against winter samples. Urban air, sampled at Belfast, which has originated in Europe shows enriched values for hydrocarbons while air which has originated in the Arctic Ocean is most similar to marine air off the Atlantic, sampled at Mace Head, Ireland.