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UK Microgeneration. Part 1 : Policy and behavioural aspects

Bergman, N. and Hawkes, A. and Brett, D.J.L. and Baker, P. and Barton, J. and Blanchard, R. and Brandon, N.P. and Infield, David and Jardine, C. and Kelly, Nicolas and Leach, M. and Matian, M. and Peacock, A.D. and Staffell, I. and Sudtharalingam, S. and Woodman, B. (2009) UK Microgeneration. Part 1 : Policy and behavioural aspects. Proceedings of the ICE - Energy, 162 (1). pp. 23-36. ISSN 1751-4231

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    Abstract

    A critical review of the literature relating to government policy and behavioural aspects relevant to the uptake and application of microgeneration in the UK is presented. Given the current policy context aspiring to zero-carbon new homes by 2016 and a variety of minimum standards and financial policy instruments supporting microgeneration in existing dwellings, it appears that this class of technologies could make a significant contribution to UK energy supply and low-carbon buildings in the future. Indeed, achievement of a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 80% (the UK government's 2050 target) for the residential sector may entail substantial deployment of microgeneration. Realisation of the large potential market for microgeneration relies on a variety of interrelated factors such as microeconomics, behavioural aspects, the structure of supporting policy instruments and well-informed technology development. This paper explores these issues in terms of current and proposed policy instruments in the UK. Behavioural aspects associated with both initial uptake of the technology and after purchase are also considered.