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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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Wireless sensor networks in agriculture: cattle monitoring for farming industries

Kwong, K.H. and Wu, T. and Goh, H. and Stephen, B. and Gilroy, M.P. and Michie, C. and Andonovic, I. (2009) Wireless sensor networks in agriculture: cattle monitoring for farming industries. In: Progress in Electromagnetics Research Symposium Proceedings. Progress in Electromagnetics Research Symposium, 1 and 2 . Electromagnetics Academy, pp. 1719-1723. ISBN 978-1-934142-08-0

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Abstract

This paper investigates an adaptation of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) to cattle monitoring application. The proposed solution facilitates a desired requirement of continuously assessing the condition of individual animal, aggregating and reporting these data to the farm manager. There are several existing approaches to animal monitoring, from using a store and forward mechanisms to employing a GSM technique. These approaches for monitoring livestock health can only provide sporadic information and introduce a considerable cost in staffing and physical hardware. The core of this study is to overcome the aforementioned draw-backs by using alternative low cost, low power consumption sensor nodes, which are capable of providing real-time communications at a reasonable hardware cost. In this paper, the hardware and software have been carefully designed to provide early indication of possible outbreaks while conforming to WSNs' stringent limitations.