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Some remarks on particle size effects on the abrasion of a range of Fe based alloys

Chacón-Nava, José G. and Martínez-Villafañe, Alberto and Almeraya-Calderón, F. and Cabral-Miramontes, J.A. and Stack, Margaret (2010) Some remarks on particle size effects on the abrasion of a range of Fe based alloys. Tribology International, 43 (8). pp. 1307-1317. ISSN 0301-679X

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Abstract

The low-stress three body abrasion behaviour of a range of steels was investigated. The tests were carried out in a rubber wheel tester (according to ASTM G65-94, reapproved in 2000) at room temperature. The abrasive particles used were angular alumina particles of four different sizes. The results showed that, in general, the smaller particles (50 8m and 125 8m average size) caused more damage. With these particles, observations of surface morphology indicarted a more intense cutting and ploughing action, leading to more damage, whereas bigger particles i.e. larger 250 8m and 560 8m particles produced less damage, and their action involved more plastic deformation type wear. The 304 SS had a lower abrasion resistance than the 310 SS. For the austentic and ferritic steels the subsurface deformation was larger for impact with the coarser particles. Variations in substrate hardness had no effect on the abrasive behaviour observed. On the whole, the hardest steel (mild steel in martensitic condition) showed the higher extent of damage, irrespective of particle size.