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Performance measurement: questions for tomorrow

Bititci, U. and Garengo, P. and Dörfler, V. and Mendibil, K. (2009) Performance measurement: questions for tomorrow. In: Advanced Production Management Systems, 1900-01-01.

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    Abstract

    Ever since Johnson and Kaplan (1987) published their seminal article performance measurement gained increasing popularity both in practice and research with over 3600 articles between 1994 and 1996. A précis of the literature on global and business trends predicts that the world is heading towards a networking era dominated by global autopoietic networks. A systematic review of the performance measurement literature concludes that although historically the performance measurement literature had tracked the global business trends our current state of knowledge on performance measurement is not complete and a number of fundamental questions remain unanswered, particularly in the context of future trends.