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Where technology & law meet: Open Access research on data security & its regulation ...

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs exploring both the technical aspects of computer security, but also the regulation of existing or emerging technologies. A research specialism of the Department of Computer & Information Sciences (CIS) is computer security. Researchers explore issues surrounding web intrusion detection techniques, malware characteristics, textual steganography and trusted systems. Digital forensics and cyber crime are also a focus.

Meanwhile, the School of Law and its Centre for Internet Law & Policy undertake studies on Internet governance. An important component of this work is consideration of privacy and data protection questions and the increasing focus on cybercrime and 'cyberterrorism'.

Explore the Open Access research by CIS on computer security or the School of Law's work on law, technology and regulation. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Finite element analysis of two-turn incremental ECAP

Rosochowski, A. and Olejnik, L. (2008) Finite element analysis of two-turn incremental ECAP. International Journal of Material Forming, 1 (Suppl ). pp. 483-486. ISSN 1960-6206

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Abstract

Ultrafine grained (UFG) metals produced by severe plastic deformation (SPD) are characterised by improved mechanical properties, which make them suitable for advanced applications. However, the practical uses of UFG metals are rare because of the lack of industrial methods of SPD. This paper describes a new SPD process of Incremental ECAP (I-ECAP) in the two-turn, S-shape channel version. While I-ECAP opens up a possibility of continuous processing of very long billets, it still involves numerous repetitions to accumulate a large plastic strain required for advanced structural changes. The two-turn version of this process doubles the amount of plastic strain generated in one operation and, therefore, improves process productivity. In order to check the feasibility of two-turn I-ECAP, a FEA simulation is carried out and the suitable tool geometry and process kinematics are established. The mode of material flow is the same as in the well established classical ECAP (route C) process, while continuous character and improved productivity suggest that the new process might be suitable for nanostructuring of metals on industrial scale.