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Miss, what's my name? New teacher identity as a question of reciprocal ontological security

McNally, Jim and Blake, Allan (2012) Miss, what's my name? New teacher identity as a question of reciprocal ontological security. Educational Philosophy and Theory, 44 (2). pp. 196-211. ISSN 0013-1857

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Abstract

This paper extends the dialogue of educational philosophy to the experience of beginners entering the teaching profession. Rather than impose the ideas of any specific philosopher or theorist, or indeed official standard, the exploration presented here owes its origins to phenomenology and the use of grounded theory. Working from a narrative data base and focussing on the knowing of name in the first instance, the authors develop their emergent ideas on self and identity in relation to children taught, through connection to a wider literature that includes reference to Giddens, Illeris, Deleuze and Heidegger, for example. The paper is thus also an exercise in suggesting that research on practice by academics working in professional education, who are non-philosophers, can lead to constructive and relevant engagement with philosophy in developing theory from and about about practice, even though the approach, in the initial stages, may well be serendipitous and eclectic in nature.