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Factors affecting user performance in haptic assembly

Lim, T.C. and Ritchie, J.M. and Dewar, R. and Corney, J.R. and Wilkinson, P. and Callis, M. and Desmulliez, M. and Fang, J.J. (2007) Factors affecting user performance in haptic assembly. Virtual Reality, 11 (4). pp. 241-252. ISSN 1359-4338

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Abstract

Current computer-aided assembly systems provide engineers with a variety of spatial snapping and alignment techniques for interactively defining the positions and attachments of components. With the advent of haptics and its integration into virtual assembly systems, users now have the potential advantage of tactile information. This paper reports research that aims to quantify how the provision of haptic feedback in an assembly system can affect user performance. To investigate human–computer interaction processes in assembly modeling, performance of a peg-in-hole manipulation was studied to determine the extent to which haptics and stereovision may impact on task completion time. The results support two important conclusions: first, it is apparent that small (i.e. visually insignificant) assembly features (e.g. chamfers) affect the overall task completion at times only when haptic feedback is provided; and second, that the difference is approximately similar to the values reported for equivalent real world peg-in-hole assembly tasks.