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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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M4 agonists/5HT7 antagonists with potential as antischizophrenic drugs: serominic compounds

Suckling, C.J. and Murphy, J.A. and Khalaf, A.I. and Zhou, S. and Lizos, D.E. and Nguyen Van Nhien, A. and Yasumatsu, H. and McVie, A. and Young, L.C. and McCraw, C. and Waterman, P.G. and Morris, B.J. and Pratt, J.A. and Harvey, A. (2007) M4 agonists/5HT7 antagonists with potential as antischizophrenic drugs: serominic compounds. Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters, 17 (9). pp. 2649-2655. ISSN 0960-894X

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Abstract

Chronic low-dose treatment of rats with the psychomimetic drug, phencyclidine, induces regionally specific metabolic and neurochemical changes in the CNS that mirror those observed in the brains of schizophrenic patients. Recent evidence suggests that drugs targeting serotoninergic and muscarinic receptors, and in particular 5-HT7 antagonists and M4 agonists, exert beneficial effects in this model of schizophrenia. Compounds that display this combined pattern of activity we refer to as serominic compounds. Based upon leads from natural product screening, we have designed and synthesised such serominic compounds, which are principally arylamidine derivatives of tetrahydroisoquinolines, and shown that they have the required serominic profile in ligand binding assays and show potential antipsychotic activity in functional assays.