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A holistic analysis method to assess the controllability of commercial buildings and their systems

Counsell, John M. and Khalid, Yousaf A. (2009) A holistic analysis method to assess the controllability of commercial buildings and their systems. In: 3rd International Conference on Sustainable Energy and Environmental Protection, SEEP 2009, 2009-08-12 - 2009-08-15.

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Abstract

This paper describes a novel design process for advanced MIMO (multiple inputs and multiple outputs) control system design and simulation for buildings. The paper describes the knowledge transfer from high technology disciplines such as aerospace flight control systems and the space industry to establish a three-step modelling and design process. In step 1, simplified, but holistic nonlinear and linearised dynamic models of the building and its systems is derived. This model is used to analyse the controllability of the building. In step 2, further synthesis of this model leads to the correct topology of the control system design. This is proved through the use of simulation using the simple building model. In step 3, the controller design is proved using a fully detailed building simulation such as ESP-r that acts as a type of virtual prototype of the building. The conclusions show that this design approach can help in the design of superior and more complex control systems especially for buildings designed with a Climate Adaptive Building (CAB) philosophy where many control inputs and outputs are used to control the building's temperature, concentration of CO2, humidity and lighting levels.