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A multi-criteria performance study of an integrated demand/supply energy system for low and zero carbon technologies within domestic building design

Clarke, Joseph Andrew and Johnstone, Cameron and Hong, Jun and Kim, Jae Min and Strachan, Paul and Hwang, I. and Li, Hongjun (2007) A multi-criteria performance study of an integrated demand/supply energy system for low and zero carbon technologies within domestic building design. In: 10th IBPSA Conference on Building Simulation 2007, 2007-09-03 - 2007-09-06.

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Abstract

When low carbon and renewable energy (RE) systems are adopted in a building, matching the outputs from RE systems (e.g. photovoltaic, solar collectors, small scale wind turbines and heat pumps) to demand has to be taken into account to fully realise the potential of the hybrid energy system. Considering the varying demand profiles due to different building design options (e.g. orientation, construction types etc), it is necessary to evaluate key technology elements in an integrated context and establish appropriate strategies for simultaneously meeting heating and electricity loads as well as matching demand and supply. This paper presents a new approach to evaluate the interactive effects of low carbon technologies and demand reduction measures in the early design stage of a new building. A case study of a sustainable domestic building project (PLUS 50), was implemented on the basis of the proposed design approach.