Picture of smart phone in human hand

World leading smartphone and mobile technology research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in researching exciting new applications for mobile and smartphone technology. But the transformative application of mobile technologies is also the focus of research within disciplines as diverse as Electronic & Electrical Engineering, Marketing, Human Resource Management and Biomedical Enginering, among others.

Explore Strathclyde's Open Access research on smartphone technology now...

Quantitative assessment of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering for the analysis of dyes on colloidal silver

Jones, J.C. and McLaughlin, C. and Littlejohn, D. and Sadler, D.A. and Graham, D. and Smith, W.E. (1999) Quantitative assessment of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering for the analysis of dyes on colloidal silver. Analytical Chemistry, 71 (3). pp. 596-601. ISSN 0003-2700

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Factors that affect quantitative analysis by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) have been investigated using azobenzotriazol and reactive dyes. Preaggregation of the silver colloid was the most effective method to obtain repeatable and reproducible scattering. Aggregation by poly(L-lysine) or spermine provided better precision than aggregation by sodium chloride or nitric acid. Repeatable quantitative analysis was achieved with the azobenzotriazol dyes. A linear calibration graph was obtained over different concentration ranges below 10(-8) M, depending on the nature of the colloid. Calculations estimate that 10(-8) M is the concentration at which monolayer coverage of the dye on the silver colloid is achieved. Above 10(-8) M, there was only a minor increase in the scattering intensity from the azobenzotriazol dyes. In contrast, the reactive dyes did not give a response proportional to concentration over the range studied. The different responses obtained for the two types of dye are believed to be caused by differences in the nature of the interaction of the molecules with the silver surface. The conclusion reached is that control of the colloid preparation, aggregation process, and surface chemistry are essential for successful quantitative analysis of dyes on colloidal silver by SERRS.