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Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

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Culinary culture, gastrobrands and identity myths: 'Nigella', an iconic brand in the baking

Hewer, P.A. and Brownlie, D. (2009) Culinary culture, gastrobrands and identity myths: 'Nigella', an iconic brand in the baking. In: Advances in Consumer Research, 2009-10-01.

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Abstract

In his perceptive and persuasive rendering of the nature of consumer society and its obsession with fame and celebrity, McCracken (2005) states that 'the celebrity world is one of the most potent sources of cultural meaning at the disposal of the marketing system and the individual consumer'(ibid, 113). Indeed, as Pringle (2004) so bluntly puts it, 'celebrity sells'. While both authors transport us back to the 1960s and McLuhan's powerful analysis ofthe 'transforming power of media' (1964, 20), Pringle offers a managerial take on the growing complexity of the media environment, where media fragmentation, global reach and the explosion of celebrity culture go hand in hand. Olsen (1999) trenchantly observes that by virtue of the global distribution of its manufactured media product, the US Film and TV media industry is effectively assembling a 'Hollywood Planet'. Pringle takes the view that 'the celebrity phenomenon has largely been created by [US] movies and television [although] there is no doubt that other media have play[ed] a significant part' (ibid, 10).