Strathprints Home | Open Access | Browse | Search | User area | Copyright | Help | Library Home | SUPrimo

Drugs, consumption and supply in Asia: the case of cocaine in colonial India

Mills, J.H. (2007) Drugs, consumption and supply in Asia: the case of cocaine in colonial India. Journal of Asian Studies, 66 (2). pp. 345-62. ISSN 0021 9118

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

This article examines the market for cocaine in India during the early twentieth century and the efforts of the colonial state to control it. The British authorities issued regulations to prohibit the drug's use as early as 1900, and yet by the start of World War I, cocaine's appeal had become socially diverse and geographically wide. This account of a significant market for a powerful new drug suggests that Indian society was able to rapidly develop a demand for such products even when the colonial state had no part in their introduction. Indians used these new products in complex ways-as medicines, as tonics, and as intoxicants, albeit through the localized medium of the everyday paan leaf. The study points to a reconsideration of a number of debates about the history of drugs and modern medicines in Asia.

Item type: Article
ID code: 8890
Keywords: drugs, consumption, drugs supply, asia, cocaine, colonial india, History, Asia, Cultural Studies
Subjects: History General and Old World
History General and Old World > Asia
Department: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences (HaSS) > School of Humanities > History
Related URLs:
    Depositing user: Strathprints Administrator
    Date Deposited: 21 Sep 2009 11:07
    Last modified: 04 Sep 2014 21:00
    URI: http://strathprints.strath.ac.uk/id/eprint/8890

    Actions (login required)

    View Item