Picture of two heads

Open Access research that challenges the mind...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including those from the School of Psychological Sciences & Health - but also papers by researchers based within the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

Extended period reliability analysis of water distribution systems based on head driven simulation method

Tabesh, M. and Tanyimboh, T. and Burrows, R. (2001) Extended period reliability analysis of water distribution systems based on head driven simulation method. In: State of the practice: Proceedings of the world water and environmental resources congress, May 20-24, 2001. American Society of Civil Engineers, Reston, Virginia, USA. ISBN 078440562X

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)


Since demands are not fixed through the 24 hours of a day, any reliability analysis based on just one snapshot analysis, which considers daily average or peak demands, cannot represent the overall system reliability realistically. In this paper the variations of system and nodal reliability values are investigated through a period of time. This paper combines the extended period simulation of water distribution networks with the head driven simulation based reliability analysis which presents the nodal and system reliabilities more realistic than conventional demand driven based analysis. The pressure dependent analysis considers variation of outflows based on pressure variations; however, demand driven simulation method considers fix demand, regardless of pressure variations. A sample network with possibility of one link failure is examined and diurnal profile of reliability values is presented. It is seen that based on the required criteria, reliability values for the critical time or node are crucial to properly show the severity of mechanical and hydraulic failures on the hydraulic performance of the system.