Picture of virus under microscope

Research under the microscope...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

Explore SIPBS research

Contra-rotating marine current turbines : single point tethered floating system - stabilty and performance

Clarke, Joseph Andrew and Connor, Gary and Grant, Andrew and Johnstone, Cameron and Ordonez Sanchez, Stephanie Eugenia (2009) Contra-rotating marine current turbines : single point tethered floating system - stabilty and performance. In: 8th European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference, EWTEC 2009, 2009-09-07 - 2009-09-10.

[img]
Preview
PDF (strathprints008453.pdf)
strathprints008453.pdf

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

The Energy Systems Research Unit within the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Strathclyde has developed a novel contra-rotating tidal turbine (CoRMaT). A series of tank and sea tests have led to the development and deployment of a small stand-alone next generation tidal turbine. Novel aspects of this turbine include its single point compliant mooring system, direct drive open to sea permanent magnet generator, and two contra-rotating sets of rotor blades. The sea testing of the turbine off the west coast of Scotland in the Sound of Islay is described; the resulting stability of a single-point tethered device and power quality from the direct drive generator is reported and evaluated. It is noted that reasonably good moored turbine stability within a real tidal stream can be achieved with careful design; however even quite small instabilities have an effect on the output electrical power quality. Finally, the power take-off and delivery options for a 250kW production prototype are described and assessed.