Picture of smart phone in human hand

World leading smartphone and mobile technology research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in researching exciting new applications for mobile and smartphone technology. But the transformative application of mobile technologies is also the focus of research within disciplines as diverse as Electronic & Electrical Engineering, Marketing, Human Resource Management and Biomedical Enginering, among others.

Explore Strathclyde's Open Access research on smartphone technology now...

Inhibition of glutathione reductase by chromium (VI)

Bibi, S. and Angeli, F. and Grant, M.H. (2004) Inhibition of glutathione reductase by chromium (VI). In: Proceedings of the British Pharmacological Society Conference 2004. British Pharmacological Society.

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Chromium (VI) compounds have serious toxic and carcinogenic effects in humans. To exert toxicity and carcinogenicity Cr (VI) must be reduced inside cells, and it can be reduced both enzymatically and non-enyzmatically. Glutathione reductase (GR) has been implicated in the intracellular reduction of Cr (VI). This enzyme normally re-cycles reduced glutathione (GSH) from oxidized glutathione (GSSG), and is essential for protecting cells against intermediates which deplete GSH, and against oxidative stress. During its reduction inside cells Cr (VI) disrupts redox balance, and generates reactive oxygen species. These oxidize GSH and deplete reduced thiols, leading to toxicity and carcinogenesis. Susceptibility to Cr (VI) will depend on the ability of cells to protect themselves by recycling GSH via GR. The effect of exposure to Cr (VI) in vitro on the activity of GR in cells derived from liver (Hep G2 cells), colon (HT 115 cells), larynx (Hep 2 cells) and macrophages (J774.1 cells) was investigated.