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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Determination of the mechanical properties of the hip joint capsule

Apatsidis, P.D. and Nicol, A.C. and Morlock, M.M. (2002) Determination of the mechanical properties of the hip joint capsule. International Conference Engineers & Surgeons - Joined at the Hip : Refining Future Strategies in Total Hip Replacement . Institution of Mechanical Engineers.

Full text not available in this repository.

Abstract

Hip joint capsular ligaments have not been studied sufficiently in the past and very little is known about their mechanical properties. One of the most recent studies presents data on the two ileofemoral ligaments (medial and lateral) and the ischiofemoral ligament. This data is based on tensile tests that were performed at low strain rates (0.04mm/s) In this present study the aim was to generate knowledge on the mechanical properties of the capsular ligaments in the intact human cadaveric hip joint. This way the risk of damaging the ligaments when exercising them is eliminated and chossing the right borders of each ligament becomes redundant. Another advantage of testing the hip joint ligaments in an intact joint is that by reproducing the kinematics of the joint the restraining effect of the ligaments on the joint can be simulated realistically. In this way it is possible to determine the stabilising effect of all hip ligaments together as they surround the hip joint like a sleeve and also the individual contribution of each of the ligaments.