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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

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Vascular prostheses : performance related to cell-shear responses

Andrews, K.D. and Feugier, P. and Black, R.A. and Hunt, J.A. (2008) Vascular prostheses : performance related to cell-shear responses. Journal of Surgical Research, 149 (1). pp. 39-46. ISSN 0022-4804

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Abstract

This work concerned the endothelialization of vascular prostheses and subsequent improvement of functionality with respect to tissue engineering. The aim of the study was to investigate the initial, pre-shear stress cellular behavior with respect to three vascular biomaterials to explain subsequent cellular responses to physiological shear stresses. All three vascular biomaterials demonstrated different structures. Cell behavior varied both between the materials and the two cell types: cytoskeletal involvement was greater for the HUVECs and the more fibrous surfaces; height profiles were greater for the L929 and PET, and lowest on PU. Immunohistochemistry of HUVEC samples also showed differences: PU revealed the greatest expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin (PET and ePTFE the lowest, respectively); ePTFE produced the greatest for vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (PET the lowest). Material substrate influenced the cellular response. Cells demonstrating firm adhesion increased their cytoskeletal processes and expression of cell-substratum and inter-cellular adhesion markers, which may explain their ability to adapt more readily to shear stress. The fibrous PU structure appeared to be most suited to further shear stress exposure. This study demonstrated the potential of the underlying vascular material to affect the long-term cellular functionality of the prosthesis.