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Comparison of continuous and pulsed light sources for photoreactivation of listeria monocytogenes

Lani, M.N. and Anderson, J.G. and MacGregor, S.J. and Woolsey, G. (2006) Comparison of continuous and pulsed light sources for photoreactivation of listeria monocytogenes. In: Society for General Microbiology 158th Meeting, 2006-04-03 - 2006-04-06, Warwick, United Kingdom.

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Abstract

Photoreactivation is a process that generates repair of ultravioletradiation (UV) damage in micro-organisms. Repair involves the DNA photolyase enzyme, which uses energy provided by light of wavelengths between 300 and 450 nm to reverse many types of DNA damage. Most studies of photoreactivation have relied on irradiation with continuous-wave (CW) light. This study examines the repair of UV-induced damage using both CW light from a bank of fluorescent lamps in a light cabinet, and pulsed light provided by a xenon flashlamp.

Item type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)
ID code: 8255
Keywords: continuous and pulsed light sources, photoreactivation, listeria monocytogenes, Science (General), Electrical engineering. Electronics Nuclear engineering, Biology
Subjects: Science > Science (General)
Technology > Electrical engineering. Electronics Nuclear engineering
Science > Natural history > Biology
Department: Faculty of Engineering > Electronic and Electrical Engineering
Professional Services > Catering, Conferencing and Events
Related URLs:
    Depositing user: Strathprints Administrator
    Date Deposited: 07 Sep 2009 10:04
    Last modified: 07 Dec 2013 12:02
    URI: http://strathprints.strath.ac.uk/id/eprint/8255

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