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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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A review of anti-inflammatory stratagies in cardiac surgery

Asimakopoulos, G. and Gourlay, T. (2003) A review of anti-inflammatory stratagies in cardiac surgery. Perfusion, 1. pp. 7-12. ISSN 0267-6591

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Abstract

It is generally accepted that cardiac surgery is frequently associated with the development of systemic inflammatory response. This phenomenon is very variable clinically, and can be detected by measuring plasma concentrations of certain inflammatory markers. Complement component, cytokines and adhesion molecules are examples of these markers. Systemic inflammation can be potentially damaging to major organs. Several anti-inflammatory strategies have been used in recent years, aiming to attenuate the development of systemic inflammatory response. This article summarizes recently published literature concerning the use of anti-inflammatory techniques and pharmacological agents in cardiac surgery. In particular, the anti-inflammatory effects of off-pump surgery, leukocyte filtration, corticosteroids, aprotinin, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, dpoexamine, H2 antagonists and ACE inhibitors are reviewed. The overall conclusion is that although certain strategies reduce plasma levels of inflammatory mediators, convincing evidence of significant clinical benefits is yet to come.