Picture of person typing on laptop with programming code visible on the laptop screen

World class computing and information science research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

Explore

Etching and micro-optics fabrication in diamond using chlorine-based inductively-coupled plasma

Lee, C.L. and Gu, E. and Dawson, M.D. and Friel, I. and Scarsbrook, G. (2008) Etching and micro-optics fabrication in diamond using chlorine-based inductively-coupled plasma. Diamond and Related Materials, 17 (7-10). pp. 1292-1296. ISSN 0925-9635

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

The effect of Inductively-Coupled Plasma (ICP) etching on diamond using chlorine-based plasma has been investigated. The diamond materials studied include type IIa natural diamond, High Pressure and High Temperature (HPHT) diamond and Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond. It was found that argon and chlorine (Ar/Cl2) ICP plasma etching can improve the smoothness of the diamond surface. By using this method, a minimum root-mean-squared (rms) surface roughness of 0.19 nm has been achieved. To demonstrate optimized Ar/Cl2 plasma etching, diamond spherical micro-lenses and micro-trenches were fabricated. Compared to argon and oxygen (Ar/O2) plasma etching, Ar/Cl2 plasma etching has a low selectivity with respect to the photo-resist mask, which enables an accurate control over the dimensions of the microstructures fabricated. The surface quality and profiles of these micro-lenses and micro-trenches were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and were shown to be better than those fabricated by Ar/O2 ICP plasma.