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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

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The 310-340nm ultraviolet light emitting diodes grown using a thin GaN interlayer on a high temperature AlN buffer

Wang, T. and Lee, K.B. and Bai, J. and Parbrook, P.J. and Ranalli, G. and Wang, Q. and Airey, R. and Cullis, A.G. and Zhang, H.X. and Massoubre, D. and Gong, Z. and Watson, I.M. and Gu, E. and Dawson, M.D. (2008) The 310-340nm ultraviolet light emitting diodes grown using a thin GaN interlayer on a high temperature AlN buffer. Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, 41 (9). 094003. ISSN 0022-3727

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Abstract

Previously, we reported that a thin GaN interlayer approach has been developed for growth of 340 nm ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) with significantly improved performance. In this paper, more recent results on the further development of UV-LEDs with shorter wavelengths are reported, and the limitation of the wavelength of the UV-LEDs that can be pushed to, while retaining high device performance using the approach has been investigated. Transmission electron microscopy and device-performance data, including electrical and optical characteristics, indicated that the thin GaN interlayer approach can be effectively employed for growth of UV-LEDs to an emission wavelength approaching at least 300 nm. The approach should be taken into account in growth of UV-LEDs on sapphire substrates, as it provides a simple but effective growth method to achieve UV-LEDs with high performance. This paper also reports that a micro-LED array using the UV-LED wafer has been successfully fabricated, offering versatile micro-structured UV light sources for a wide range of applications.