Picture of athlete cycling

Open Access research with a real impact on health...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

Explore open research content by Physical Activity for Health...

In-vitro permeation of drugs into porcine hair follicles: is it quantitatively equivalent to permeation into human hair follicles?

Meidan, V.M. and Frum, Y. and Eccleston, G.M. (2008) In-vitro permeation of drugs into porcine hair follicles: is it quantitatively equivalent to permeation into human hair follicles? Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 60 (2). pp. 145-151. ISSN 0022-3573

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

It is already well-established that the general permeability properties of porcine skin are close to those of human skin. However, very little is known with respect to drug absorption into hair follicles and the similarities if any between the two types of tissue. The aim of this study was to use the skin sandwich system to quantify follicular drug absorption into porcine hair follicles. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the skin sandwich has been extended to porcine tissue. For this purpose, seven different drugs - estradiol, corticosterone, hydrocortisone, aldosterone, cimetidine, deoxyadenosine and adenosine - exhibiting a wide range of log octanol-water partition coefficients (log Ko/w), but comparable molecular weights, were chosen as candidate solutes. The results showed a parabolic profile with maximal follicular contribution occurring at intermediate log Ko/w values. Linear regression analysis indicated that the follicular contributions in porcine skin correlated well with previously published follicular contributions in human skin (r2 = 0.87). The novelty of this research is that we show that porcine tissue is a good surrogate for modelling human skin permeability within the specific context of quantifying drug absorption into hair follicles.