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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

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Partial discharge monitoring for power transformers using UHF sensors Part 1: sensors and signal interpretation

Judd, M.D. and Yang, Li and Hunter, I.B.B. (2005) Partial discharge monitoring for power transformers using UHF sensors Part 1: sensors and signal interpretation. IEEE Electrical Insulation Magazine, 21 (2). pp. 5-14. ISSN 0883-7554

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Abstract

Determining whether power transformers are suffering from internal arcing or dangerous levels of partial discharge (PD) is important because failure without warning can result in damage to neighboring equipment, customer dissatisfaction, disruption to economic activity, and the imposition of regulatory fines. This paper provides an overview of the excitation of UHF signals by PD inside transformers. The use of externally mounted sensors has been outlined, and the structure of a dielectric window that can be constructed on an inspection hatch has been outlined. Attenuation of UHF signals propagating inside a transformer tank has been shown to be relatively low. A new approach to locating PD sources in three dimensions has been presented, based on using a numerical model of the transformer materials, which defines electromagnetic propagation velocities on a mesh of 5-cm sub-cells. The concepts of the propagation-velocity matrix (PVM) and the propagation-time matrix (PTM) were thereby introduced. Once the PD source has been located to a specific region of the transformer, the PVM might be used to index a database of physical descriptions of the transformer that could provide additional information to assist with diagnosis.