Picture of athlete cycling

Open Access research with a real impact on health...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

Explore open research content by Physical Activity for Health...

Building technological capability in the context of globalization: opportunities and challenges facing developing countries

Huq, M.M. (2004) Building technological capability in the context of globalization: opportunities and challenges facing developing countries. International Journal of Technology Management and Sustainable Development, 3 (3). pp. 155-172. ISSN 1474-2748

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

It is an honour to edit this special issue on 'Globalization and Technology Development', the publication of which is an outcome of the 2003 DSA (Development Studies Association) Annual Conference held in Glasgow at the University of Strathclyde, itself a source of pioneering studies on technology and development. This recent conference coincided with the twenty-fifth anniversary of the first assembly of the DSA, held at Strathclyde, for which the David Livingstone Institute of Overseas Development Studies, then actively investigating technology choice in developing countries, took a leading role. In introducing this special issue, an attempt will be made to highlight the case for explicit, coherent and effective technology policy as the way forward in rapidly globalizing economies, especially those in the developing world. In this regard, this introductory paper will invoke some recently published evidence from three countries of the Indian subcontinent, namely Bangladesh, India and Nepal, all of which are low-income developing countries.