Picture of a black hole

Strathclyde Open Access research that creates ripples...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde physicists involved in observing gravitational waves and black hole mergers as part of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) - but also other internationally significant research from the Department of Physics. Discover why Strathclyde's physics research is making ripples...

Strathprints also exposes world leading research from the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

Head-driven simulation of water supply networks

Tabesh, M. and Tanyimboh, T. and Burrows, R. (2002) Head-driven simulation of water supply networks. International Journal of Engineering, 15 (1). pp. 11-22.

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

Most network simulation models currently used in engineering practice are based on the conventional demand driven analysis (DDA), which assumes that nodal consumptions are fixed irrespective of the network pressure. Therefore, the DDA method is valid under normal conditions when the pressure can be expected to be adequate to satisfy the predetermined demands. If the operation of the system is simulated under pressure-critical conditions, the relationship between pressure and outflow should be taken into account if the simulation results are to be realistic. To address this issue, some researchers and have referred to the necessity of considering the pressure dependency of nodal consumption in network simulation models. In the numerical example illustrated in this paper, the Head Driven Analysis (HDA) method and T.T. Tanyimboh, B. Tahar and A.B. Templeman, Pressure-driven modelling of water distribution systems, Water Sci Technol - Water Supply 3 (2003) (1-2), pp. 255-262. was used to calculate the available flow for the reliability calculations.