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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Bacterial adhesion on bisphosphonate coated hydroxyapatite

Ganguli, A. and Lloyd, A.W. and Steward, C. and Butler, S. and Philips, G. and Meikle, S.T. and Grant, M.H. (2005) Bacterial adhesion on bisphosphonate coated hydroxyapatite. Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, 16 (4). pp. 283-287. ISSN 0957-4530

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Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is commonly associated with microbial infection of orthopaedic implants. Such infections often lead to osteomyelitis, which may result in failure of the implant due to localised bone destruction. Bacterial adhesion and subsequent colonisation of the device may occur as a consequence of contamination during surgery, or by seeding from a distant site through the blood circulation. Coating of the hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic component of artificial hip joints with the bisphosphonates clodronate (C) and pamidronate (P) has been proposed as a means to minimise osteolysis and thereby prevent loosening of the implant. However, the effect of the bisphosphonate coating on bacterial adhesion to the HA materials must be determined before this approach can be implemented. In this study coated HA materials were incubated with the S. aureus and the number of adherent bacteria determined using the Modified Vortex Device (MVD) method. The number of bacteria adherent to the P coated HA material was significantly greater than that adherent to uncoated HA (60-fold increase) or to the C coated HA (90-fold increase). Therefore, even though earlier studies suggested that P bound to HA may improve osseointegration, the results presented would suggest that the use of this coating may be limited by the potential increased susceptibility of the coated device to infection.