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World class computing and information science research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Reflex effects of induced muscle contraction in normal and spinal cord injured subjects

Knikou, M. and Conway, B.A. (2002) Reflex effects of induced muscle contraction in normal and spinal cord injured subjects. Muscle and Nerve, 26 (3). pp. 374-382. ISSN 0148-639X

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Abstract

The modulation of the soleus H reflex in response to functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the rectus femoris (RF) muscle and its overlying skin was examined in 11 normal adults and 6 patients with a clinically defined complete spinal cord injury (SCI). Stimulation of RF at twice motor threshold (MT) resulted in a long-lasting (>1,000 ms) and significant reduction (50-70% of control) in the size of the soleus H reflex in all normal subjects tested. For five of the SCI subjects, 2MT stimulation of RF induced a 55-60% reduction in the soleus H reflex that was also long-lasting (>160 ms). In the remaining SCI subject, 2MT stimulation resulted in an initial period of significant H-reflex facilitation (0-14 ms) that was followed by a longer-lasting inhibition commencing 60 ms after the cessation of the conditioning stimulation. Decreasing the strength of stimulation to below that required to generate a clear contraction in RF resulted in mixed facilitatory and inhibitory actions that were subject dependent. The changes in H-reflex excitability resulting from FES highlight the potential use of FES in the management of hypertonicity in SCI but also suggest that the central actions of FES need to be considered when FES gait restoration programs are designed.