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Comparing control strategies using experimental and simulation results: Methodology and application to heating control of passive solar buildings

Kummert, M. and Andre, P. and Argiriou, A.A. (2006) Comparing control strategies using experimental and simulation results: Methodology and application to heating control of passive solar buildings. HVAC and R Research, 12 (3a). pp. 715-737. ISSN 1078-9669

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Abstract

Passive solar buildings combine high solar gains with a large thermal mass (or heat capacity). The problem of heating control in such buildings - or in modern, well-insulated buildings with high internal and/or solar gains - is characterized by a need of anticipation, which is illustrated in Figure 1. The figure shows that if there is no cooling plant in the building, overheating can occur during a sunny afternoon even though heating was necessary in the morning. In this case, when overheating occurs, it is too late to take a control decision for the heating plant: the heat stored in the building structure cannot be removed. If a cooling plant were present, the temperature could be maintained in the comfort zone in the afternoon, but this would increase the electricity load during on-peak hours. If afternoon overheating is anticipated, it is possible to reduce heating in the morning, saving heating energy and improving thermal comfort (and reduce cooling cost) at the same time.