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World class computing and information science research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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The measurement and prediction of conditions within indoor microenvironments

Baker, P.H. and Galbraith, Graham H. and McLean, R. Craig and Hunter, Colin and Sanders, C.H. (2006) The measurement and prediction of conditions within indoor microenvironments. Indoor and Built Environment, 15 (4). pp. 357-364. ISSN 1420-326X

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Abstract

Biocontaminants, such as dust mites and microfungi, can live in building habitats with a spatial scale of only a few millimetres. With the recent development of very small size microchip-based sensors, it is now practicable to measure the humidity at different locations within these microenvironments. In the laboratory study described here, sensors were used to measure the conditions in a number of typical flooring systems using a variety of coverings. The measurements were compared with the predictions of a well-established and validated dynamic heat and moisture transfer simulation model. In order to provide an accurate input to the model, permeability and sorption tests were carried out on the flooring materials used. Finally, using monitored domestic environmental data, simulation results were coupled to a simplified growth model to predict dust mite activity in the flooring systems under realistic boundary conditions.