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The influence of fibre length and concentration on the properties of glass fibre reinforced polypropylene: 7. Interface strength and fibre strain in injection moulded long fibre PP at high fibre content

Thomason, J.L. (2007) The influence of fibre length and concentration on the properties of glass fibre reinforced polypropylene: 7. Interface strength and fibre strain in injection moulded long fibre PP at high fibre content. Composites Part A: Applied Science and Manufacturing, 38 (1). pp. 210-216. ISSN 1359-835X

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Abstract

The mechanical performance of injection moulded long glass fibre reinforced polypropylene with a glass fibre content in the range 0-73% by weight has been investigated. The composite modulus exhibited a linear dependence on fibre content over the full range of the study. Composite strength and impact resistance exhibited a maximum in performance in the 40-50% by weight reinforcement content range. The residual fibre length, average fibre orientation, interfacial shear strength, and fibre strain at composite failure in the samples have been characterised. These parameters were also found to be fibre concentration dependent. The interfacial shear strength was found to be influenced by both physical and chemical contributions. Theoretical calculations of the composite strength using the measured micromechanical parameters enabled the observed maximum in tensile strength to be well modelled.