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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

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Rapid formation of a supramolecular polypeptide-DNA Hydrogel for in situ three-dimensional multilayer bioprinting

Li, Chuang and Faulkner-Jones, Alan and Dun, Alison R. and Jin, Juan and Chen, Ping and Xing, Yongzheng and Yang, Zhongqiang and Li, Zhibo and Shu, Wenmiao and Liu, Dongsheng and Duncan, Rory R. (2015) Rapid formation of a supramolecular polypeptide-DNA Hydrogel for in situ three-dimensional multilayer bioprinting. Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 54 (13). pp. 3957-3961. ISSN 1433-7851

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Abstract

A rapidly formed supramolecular polypeptide–DNA hydrogel was prepared and used for in situ multilayer three-dimensional bioprinting for the first time. By alternative deposition of two complementary bio-inks, designed structures can be printed. Based on their healing properties and high mechanical strengths, the printed structures are geometrically uniform without boundaries and can keep their shapes up to the millimeter scale without collapse. 3D cell printing was demonstrated to fabricate live-cell-containing structures with normal cellular functions. Together with the unique properties of biocompatibility, permeability, and biodegradability, the hydrogel becomes an ideal biomaterial for 3D bioprinting to produce designable 3D constructs for applications in tissue engineering.