Picture of smart phone in human hand

World leading smartphone and mobile technology research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in researching exciting new applications for mobile and smartphone technology. But the transformative application of mobile technologies is also the focus of research within disciplines as diverse as Electronic & Electrical Engineering, Marketing, Human Resource Management and Biomedical Enginering, among others.

Explore Strathclyde's Open Access research on smartphone technology now...

Characterising plastic collapse of pipe bend structures

Li, Hongjun and Mackenzie, Donald (2006) Characterising plastic collapse of pipe bend structures. International Journal of Pressure Vessels and Piping, 83 (2). pp. 85-95. ISSN 0308-0161

[img]
Preview
PDF
Mackenzie_D_Characterising_plastic_collapse_of_pipe_bends_Feb_2006.pdf - Final Published Version

Download (344kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text (strathprints006089)
strathprints006089.pdf - Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (403kB) | Preview

Abstract

Two recently proposed design by analysis criteria of plastic collapse based on plastic work concepts, the plastic work (PW) criterion and the plastic work curvature (PWC) criterion, are applied to a strain hardening pipe bend arrangement subject to combined pressure and in-plane moment loading. Calculated plastic pressure-moment interaction surfaces are compared with limit surfaces, large deformation analysis instability surfaces and plastic load surfaces given by the ASME Twice Elastic Slope criterion and the tangent intersection criterion. The results show that both large deformation theory and material strain hardening have a significant effect on the elastic-plastic response and calculated static strength of the component. The PW criterion is relatively simple to apply in practice and gives plastic load values similar to the tangent intersection criterion. The PWC criterion is more subjective to apply in practice but it allows the designer to follow the development of the gross plastic deformation mechanism in more detail. The PWC criterion indicates a more significant strain hardening strength enhancement effect than the other criteria considered, leading to a higher calculated plastic load.