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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Folksonomies : Indexing and Retrieval in Web 2.0

Macgregor, George (2010) Folksonomies : Indexing and Retrieval in Web 2.0. [Review]

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Abstract

One of the defining principles of Web 2.0 when it first emerged was that the collective intelligence of users should be harnessed in order to enrich services for that user community (O’Reilly, 2005). This so-called ‘network effect’ principle remains as central to the Web 2.0 thesis then as it does five years on (O’Reilly and Battelle, 2009). Folksonomies, or collaborative tagging systems, have become the epitome of the network effect; using collective intelligence to organise and retrieve information on the Web. In Folksonomies: indexing and retrieval in Web 2.0, author Isabella Peters explores the use of folksonomies in ‘collaborative information services’, a catch-all term used by Peters to encompass the heterogeneous nature of the Web 2.0 services that use tagging systems. The stated purpose of Folksonomies is to provide a degree of insight into folksonomy applications, as well as discuss their strengths, weaknesses and how their problems can be ameliorated by applying recognised information retrieval models and formal knowledge representation methods.