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Detailed pseudo-static drive train modelling with generator short circuit

Warnock, Christopher and Infield, David (2016) Detailed pseudo-static drive train modelling with generator short circuit. Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 753. ISSN 1742-6596

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Abstract

Drivetrain failures contribute significantly to wind turbine downtime. Although the root causes of these failures are not yet fully understood, transient events are regarded as an important contributory factor. Despite extensive drive train modelling, limited work has been carried out to assess the impact of a generator short circuit on the drivetrain. In most cases, a generator short circuit is classed as a failure in itself with minimal focus on the subsequent effects on the gearbox and other drivetrain components. This paper will look to analyse the loading on the drivetrain for a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) short circuit event with turbine ride through using a combination of Simulink, Garrad Hassan’s Bladed and RomaxWind drive train modelling software.