Picture of person typing on laptop with programming code visible on the laptop screen

World class computing and information science research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

Explore

A time-domain control signal detection technique for OFDM

Adegbite, Saheed A. and McMeekin, Scott G. and Stewart, Brian G. (2016) A time-domain control signal detection technique for OFDM. EURASIP Journal on Wireless Communications and Networking, 2016. ISSN 1687-1472

[img]
Preview
Text (Adegbite-etal-EURASIPJWCN2016-A-time-domain-control-signal-detection-technique-for-OFDM)
Adegbite_etal_EURASIPJWCN2016_A_time_domain_control_signal_detection_technique_for_OFDM.pdf - Final Published Version
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 logo

Download (813kB) | Preview

Abstract

Transmission of system-critical control information plays a key role in efficient management of limited wireless network resources and successful reception of payload data information. This paper uses an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) architecture to investigate the detection performance of a time-domain approach used to detect deterministic control signalling information. It considers a type of control information chosen from a finite set of information, which is known at both transmitting and receiving wireless terminals. Unlike the maximum likelihood (ML) estimation method, which is often used, the time-domain detection technique requires no channel estimation and no pilots as it uses a form of time-domain correlation as the means of detection. Results show that when compared with the ML method, the time-domain approach improves detection performance even in the presence of synchronisation error caused by carrier frequency offset.