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Directional receiver for biomimetic sonar system

Guarato, Francesco and Andrews, Heather and Windmill, James F. and Jackson, Joseph and Gachagan, Anthony (2016) Directional receiver for biomimetic sonar system. Physics Procedia, 87. pp. 24-28. ISSN 1875-3892

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Abstract

An ultrasonic localization method for a sonar system equipped with an emitter and two directional receivers and inspired by bat echolocation uses knowledge of the beam pattern of the receivers to estimate target orientation. Rousettus leschenaultii’s left ear constitutes the model for the design of the optimal receiver for this sonar system and 3D printing was used to fabricate receiver structures comprising of two truncated cones with an elliptical external perimeter and a parabolic flare rate in the upper part. Measurements show one receiver has a predominant lobe in the same region and with similar attenuation values as the bat ear model. The final sonar system is to be mounted on vehicular and aerial robots which require remote control for motion and sensors for estimation of each robot’s location.