Picture of person typing on laptop with programming code visible on the laptop screen

World class computing and information science research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

Explore

Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine for adults and children in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza in primary care in the United Kingdom : 2015/16 end-of-season results

Pebody, R and Warburton, F and Ellis, J and Andrews, N and Potts, A and Cottrel, S and Johnston, J and Reynolds, A and Gunson, R and Thompson, C and Galiano, M and Robertson, C and Byford, R and Gallagher, N and Sinnathamby, M and Yonova, I and Pathirannehelage, S and Donati, M and Moore, C and de Lusignan, S and McMenamin, J and Zambon, M (2016) Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine for adults and children in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza in primary care in the United Kingdom : 2015/16 end-of-season results. Eurosurveillance, 21 (38). pp. 1-11. ISSN 1560-7917

[img]
Preview
Text (Pebody-etal-Eurosurveillance-2016-effectiveness-of-seasonal-influenza-vaccine-for-adults-and-children)
Pebody_etal_Eurosurveillance_2016_effectiveness_of_seasonal_influenza_vaccine_for_adults_and_children.pdf - Final Published Version
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 logo

Download (337kB) | Preview

Abstract

The United Kingdom (UK) is in the third season of introducing universal paediatric influenza vaccination with a quadrivalent live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV). The 2015/16 season in the UK was initially dominated by influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and then influenza of B/Victoria lineage, not contained in that season's adult trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV). Overall adjusted end-of-season vaccine effectiveness (VE) was 52.4% (95% confidence interval (CI): 41.0-61.6) against influenza-confirmed primary care consultation, 54.5% (95% CI: 41.6-64.5) against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and 54.2% (95% CI: 33.1-68.6) against influenza B. In 2-17 year-olds, adjusted VE for LAIV was 57.6% (95% CI: 25.1 to 76.0) against any influenza, 81.4% (95% CI: 39.6-94.3) against influenza B and 41.5% (95% CI: -8.5 to 68.5) against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. These estimates demonstrate moderate to good levels of protection, particularly against influenza B in children, but relatively less against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. Despite lineage mismatch in the trivalent IIV, adults younger than 65 years were still protected against influenza B. These results provide reassurance for the UK to continue its influenza immunisation programme planned for 2016/17.