Picture of person typing on laptop with programming code visible on the laptop screen

World class computing and information science research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

Explore

Mapping the material microstructure of safety critical components using ultrasonic phased arrays

Tant, Katherine M. M. and Galetti, Erica and Mulholland, Anthony J. and Curtis, Andrew and Gachagan, Anthony (2016) Mapping the material microstructure of safety critical components using ultrasonic phased arrays. In: 2016 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS). IEEE, Piscataway, NJ.. ISBN 9781467398978

[img]
Preview
Text (Tant-etal-IUS2016-Mapping-the-material-miocrostructure-of-safety-critical-components)
Tant_etal_IUS2016_Mapping_the_material_miocrostructure_of_safety_critical_components.pdf - Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (168kB) | Preview

Abstract

Traditional imaging algorithms within the ultrasonic NDE community typically assume that the material being inspected is homogeneous. Obviously, when the medium is of a heterogeneous or anisotropic nature this assumption can contribute to the poor detection, sizing and characterisation of defects. Knowledge of the internal structure and properties of the material would allow corrective measures to be taken. The work presented here endeavours to reconstruct coarsened maps of the locally anisotropic grain structure of industrially representative samples from ultrasonic phased array data. This is achieved via application of the reversible-jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo (rj-MCMC) method: an ensemble approach within a Bayesian framework. The resulting maps are used in conjunction with the total focussing method and the reconstructed flaws are used as a quantitative measure of the success of this methodology. Using full matrix capture data arising from a finite element simulation of a phased array inspection of an austenitic weld, a 71% improvement in flaw location and an 11dB improvement in SNR is achieved using no a priori knowledge of the material's internal structure.