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Evaluating the social acceptability of voice based smartwatch search

Efthymiou, Christos and Halvey, Martin (2016) Evaluating the social acceptability of voice based smartwatch search. In: Information Retrieval Technology. Lecture Notes in Computer Science . Springer, Switzerland, pp. 267-278. ISBN 978-3-319-48050-3

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Abstract

There has been a recent increase in the number of wearable (e.g. smartwatch, interactive glasses, etc.) devices available. Coupled with this there has been a surge in the number of searches that occur on mobile devices. Given these trends it is inevitable that search will become a part of wearable interaction. Given the form factor and display capabilities of wearables this will probably require a different type of search interaction to what is currently used in mobile search. This paper presents the results of a user study focusing on users’ perceptions of the use of smartwatches for search. We pay particular attention to social acceptability of different search scenarios, focussing on in-put method, device form and information need. Our findings indicate that audience and location heavily influence whether people will perform a voice based search. The results will help search system developers to support search on smartwatches.