Picture of person typing on laptop with programming code visible on the laptop screen

World class computing and information science research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

Explore

Subtle increases in BMI within a healthy weight range still reduce women's employment chances in the service sector

Nickson, Dennis and Timming, Andrew R and Re, Daniel and Perrett, David I (2016) Subtle increases in BMI within a healthy weight range still reduce women's employment chances in the service sector. PLOS One, 11 (9). ISSN 1932-6203

[img]
Preview
Other (Nickson-etal-PLOSOne2016-Women's-employment-chances-in-the-service-sector)
Nickson_etal_PLOSOne2016_Women_s_employment_chances_in_the_service_sector.PDF - Final Published Version
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 logo

Download (580kB) | Preview

Abstract

Using mixed design analysis of variance (ANOVA), this paper investigates the effects of a subtle simulated increase in adiposity on women’s employment chances in the service sector. Employing a unique simulation of altering individuals’ BMIs and the literature on “aesthetic labour”, the study suggests that, especially for women, being heavier, but still within a healthy BMI, deleteriously impacts on hireability ratings. The paper explores the gendered dimension of this prejudice by asking whether female employees at the upper end of a healthy BMI range are likely to be viewed more negatively than their overtly overweight male counterparts. The paper concludes by considering the implications of these findings.