Picture of athlete cycling

Open Access research with a real impact on health...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

Explore open research content by Physical Activity for Health...

Work, Water and Food on the Energy Frontiers : Challenges and Futures for 21st Century Technologies in Scotland and Brazil

Stewart, Paul and Garvey, Brian and João, Elsa and Tuohy, Paul and Silva Plata, Catalina and Mendonca, Marcelo and Oliveira, Adriano Rodriques and Santos, Crispin and Alves, Leonardo Costa and Gonçalves, Ricardo J Assis F. and Souza, Edevaldo Aparecido and Mazzu, Alessia and Sheridan, Paul and Shearer, Alexander and Breen, Lewis and de Bartolo, Candice (2016) Work, Water and Food on the Energy Frontiers : Challenges and Futures for 21st Century Technologies in Scotland and Brazil. University of Strathclyde, Glasgow.

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Economic, environmental and climatic uncertainty raises new questions about how access to, and use of, energy, land, water and food is organised. New large scale sources of ‘renewable’ energy such as biomass (agroenergy) plantations and hydrodams are promoted as bringing development, trade and employment opportunities to rural areas. The research undertaken here in Brazil and Scotland by a group of social and engineering scientists alongside rural communities and organisations present particular social and environmental conflicts arising from new technologies, but also current and potential alternatives for renewable energy and food provision that promise improved relations between those who do the work, their communities and the natural environment.