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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

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The impact of badminton on health markers in untrained females

Patterson, Stephen and Pattison, John and Legg, Hayley and Gibson, Ann-Marie and Brown, Nicola (2016) The impact of badminton on health markers in untrained females. Journal of Sports Sciences. pp. 1-31. ISSN 0264-0414 (In Press)

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Patterson_etal_JSS_2016_impact_of_badminton_on_health_markers_in_untrained_females.pdf - Accepted Author Manuscript
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Abstract

The purpose of the study was to examine the health effects of eight weeks of recreational badminton in untrained women. Participants were matched for maximal oxygen uptake (V̇ O2max) and body fat percentage and assigned to either a badminton (n = 14), running (n = 14) or control group (n = 8). Assessments were conducted pre and post intervention with physiological, anthropometric, motivation to exercise and physical self-esteem data collected. Post-intervention, V̇ O2max increased (P < 0.05) by 16% and 14% in the badminton and running groups respectively and time to exhaustion increased (P < 0.05) by 19% for both interventions. Maximal power output was increased (P < 0.05) by 13% in the badminton group only. Blood pressure, resting heart rate and heart rate during submaximal running was lower (P < 0.05) in both interventions. Perceptions of physical conditioning increased (P < 0.05) in both interventions. There were increases (P < 0.05) in enjoyment and ill health motives in the running group only, whilst affiliation motives were higher (P < 0.05) for the badminton group only. Findings suggest that badminton should be considered a strategy to improving the health and wellbeing of untrained females who are currently not meeting physical activity guidelines.