Picture of athlete cycling

Open Access research with a real impact on health...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

Explore open research content by Physical Activity for Health...

Novel polymer materials for low-cost nitro vapor detection sensors

Blue, Robert and Uttamchandani, Deepak and Thomson, Neil and Skabara, Peter (2015) Novel polymer materials for low-cost nitro vapor detection sensors. In: 2015 IEEE SENSORS Proceedings. IEEE, Piscataway, NJ., pp. 1-4. ISBN 9781479982028

[img]
Preview
Text (Blue-etal-Sensors2015-Novel-polymer-materials-for-low-cost-nitro-vapor-detection-sensors)
Blue_etal_Sensors2015_Novel_polymer_materials_for_low_cost_nitro_vapor_detection_sensors.pdf - Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (648kB) | Preview

Abstract

Current commercial sensors for explosive vapours are high cost bulky equipment not amenable to mass production and thus prevents their mass deployment within society. Our research objective is to create compact sensors that are not only portable but of such low cost that they can be installed in buildings in the same way as smoke detectors. We have developed novel polymers whose properties have been tailored to give them a higher affinity to target nitro group (NO2) bearing molecules associated with explosives. The polymers have been grown electrochemically onto miniature interdigitated electrode platforms yielding miniature sensors. Novel porous polymers based sensors are demonstrated which yield a detection level of 200 ppb of nitro vapours and can be manufactured at low-unit-cost.