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Recovery of absolute absorption line shapes in tunable diode laser spectroscopy using external amplitude modulation with balanced detection

Bain, James R. P. and Lengden, Michael and Stewart, George and Johnstone, Walter (2016) Recovery of absolute absorption line shapes in tunable diode laser spectroscopy using external amplitude modulation with balanced detection. IEEE Sensors Journal, 16 (3). pp. 675-680. ISSN 1530-437X

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Abstract

Accurate recovery of an absorption lineshape is important in many industrial applications for simultaneous measurement of gas concentration and pressure or temperature. Here we demonstrate a method, based on a modification to the Hobbs balanced receiver circuit, for background signal nulling when external amplitude modulation of the laser output is used. Compared with direct or non-nulled detection techniques, we demonstrate that the method significantly improves the signal to noise ratio to a level comparable to that of conventional second harmonic wavelength modulation spectroscopy. Most importantly, normalisation and recovery of the lineshape is straightforward and immune to the difficulties that afflict lineshape recovery with conventional wavelength modulation spectroscopy.