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Exploring the beliefs underpinning drivers' intentions to comply with speed limits

Elliott, Mark A. and Armitage, Christopher J. and Baughan, Christopher J. (2005) Exploring the beliefs underpinning drivers' intentions to comply with speed limits. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 8 (6). pp. 459-79. ISSN 1369-8478

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Abstract

Using the theory of planned behaviour (TPB; [Ajzen, I. (1985). From intentions to actions: A theory of planned behavior. In J. Kuhl, J. Beckmann (Eds.), Action control: From cognition to behavior (pp. 11-39). Berlin: Springer-Verlag.]) as a theoretical framework, the present study was designed to: (a) identify the beliefs underpinning drivers' intentions to comply with speed limits, and (b) test the expectancy-value theory held to underpin those beliefs. A sample of drivers (N = 598) completed questionnaires designed to measure TPB variables with respect to compliance with speed limits. The results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses provided support for the expectancy-value theory held to underpin each behavioural beliefs (outcome beliefs X outcome evaluations), normative beliefs (referent beliefs X motivation to comply), and control beliefs (control frequency beliefs X control power beliefs). Belief targets for road safety countermeasures that aim persuade drivers to comply with speed limits were also identified by selecting those beliefs that were the statistically significant predictors of direct TPB measures (attitudes, subjective norm, perceived control) and intention. Theoretical and practical implications of the results are discussed.

Item type: Article
ID code: 5520
Keywords: theory of planned behaviour, expectancy-value theory, compliance with speed limits, road safety interventions, Psychology, Motor vehicles. Aeronautics. Astronautics, Applied Psychology, Automotive Engineering, Transportation
Subjects: Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > Psychology
Technology > Motor vehicles. Aeronautics. Astronautics
Department: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences (HaSS) > School of Psychological Science and Health > Psychology
Related URLs:
    Depositing user: Strathprints Administrator
    Date Deposited: 26 Feb 2008
    Last modified: 04 Sep 2014 16:50
    URI: http://strathprints.strath.ac.uk/id/eprint/5520

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